3D printer bring realism to science department

Students+in+any+class+from+Biology+to+Physics+can+reap+the+benefits+of+the+new+3D+printer+in+the+science+department.
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3D printer bring realism to science department

Students in any class from Biology to Physics can reap the benefits of the new 3D printer in the science department.

Students in any class from Biology to Physics can reap the benefits of the new 3D printer in the science department.

Lucas Barr

Students in any class from Biology to Physics can reap the benefits of the new 3D printer in the science department.

Lucas Barr

Lucas Barr

Students in any class from Biology to Physics can reap the benefits of the new 3D printer in the science department.

Lucas Barr, Staff Reporter

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Crafting models and tools is now possible for the science department after a Frisco Education Foundation grant allowed for the purchase of a 3D printer.

“This is something I took the lead on, but the other two physics teachers, Ms. Mosley and Ms. Rittenhouse were in on it,” AP Physics 1 and C teacher Kenric Davies said. “It was a grant written for the entire science department, so the idea was that everyone in the science department can use it.”

The kit for the Prusa i3 MK2 runs for $599 online and was named 3D Printer of the Year in both 2017 and 2018 by MAKE: Magazine.

“The company that we were buying this model from was located overseas,” Davies said. “We had to get the Frisco Education Foundation to purchase it for us rather than through the normal channels of the school. We wanted this particular model because it was much better than most other things on the market and for a fraction of the cost, so we were willing to fight to get this particular model.”

Physics students will be able to utilize the printer for any of their laboratory investigations or class projects.

“Biology can print models of cells and pretty much every subject can benefit from the 3D printer,” AP Physics 1 and C teacher Christine Rittenhouse said. “Physics and engineering are really closely related, and part of engineering is designing and modelling in very autocad-type programs. This allows them to get experience with those programs and actually print stuff, without necessarily being in one of the CTE Center’s engineering courses.”

Teachers have the chance to perform new labs and demonstrations for students with custom tools.

“One of the projects we’re going to use it for is some fluid dynamic and looking at optimizing some windmill blades,” science department chair Holley Mosley said. “This is great for building models, anything that are hard for students to visualize we can build models of.”