Build up others rather than yourself

Wingspan%27s+Madeline+Aronson+writes+that+being+humble+is+a+rarity+these+days+and+that+students+should+help+more+and+compete+less.+%0A
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Build up others rather than yourself

Wingspan's Madeline Aronson writes that being humble is a rarity these days and that students should help more and compete less.

Wingspan's Madeline Aronson writes that being humble is a rarity these days and that students should help more and compete less.

Roy Nitzan

Wingspan's Madeline Aronson writes that being humble is a rarity these days and that students should help more and compete less.

Roy Nitzan

Roy Nitzan

Wingspan's Madeline Aronson writes that being humble is a rarity these days and that students should help more and compete less.

Maddie Aronson, Staff Reporter

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Whether it’s nature or nurture, from an early age, we are has pushed to outdo our peers in any way, shape, or form, we can.

In first grade, it may be bickering over who has the best and flashiest stickers.

In middle school, it could be bragging about fashion trends that someone got a hold of first.

Even high schoolers walk around with inflated egos over things as small getting a good grade on an assignment.

This isn’t healthy.

It’s perfectly alright to feel proud of accomplishments or cool things that you have, but boosting your own ego can have the potential of negatively affecting your relationships with those around  you.

Being humble is a rarity these days.

All over social media, kids boast about anything that will give them an edge on their peers, or as they often view them, the competition. The people around you are here to support you, but if you act like you are better than everyone else, it could drive them away. As kids, we’re all in the same boat, and putting yourself against each other is not productive.

It bothers me when people deem themselves either more knowledgeable or more worthy, and grant themselves full permission to tell people on the same level as them what to do.

Your skill on a sports team or musical group do not necessarily give you the right to instruct your peer. Being on a team means working together for a common cause, and supporting each other rather than placing yourself above each other.

Putting yourself on a pedestal also distances you from the people around you. People around you may feel belittled, or unimportant to you, which leaves you socially isolated.

Moral of the story, you may be better at some things, you may have better opportunities than others, but remembering that we’re in this together is more important than any selfish cause. We’re all just people trying to find our place, so support each other, instead of somehow trying to prove that your better than each other.