All Voices Matter: time to act on climate change

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






In+her+weekly+column%2C+All+Voices+Matter%2C+staff+reporter+Aviance+Pritchett+gives+her+take+on+social+and+cultural+issues.+
Back to Article
Back to Article

All Voices Matter: time to act on climate change

In her weekly column, All Voices Matter, staff reporter Aviance Pritchett gives her take on social and cultural issues.

In her weekly column, All Voices Matter, staff reporter Aviance Pritchett gives her take on social and cultural issues.

Prachurjya Shreya

In her weekly column, All Voices Matter, staff reporter Aviance Pritchett gives her take on social and cultural issues.

Prachurjya Shreya

In her weekly column, All Voices Matter, staff reporter Aviance Pritchett gives her take on social and cultural issues.

We all have a responsibility for preserving this planet. We’re the only planet that we know of that can host life, and it doesn’t seem like Mars is getting more of an alternate habitat option as days go by. Reducing, reusing, and recycling isn’t going to cut it for the long run. We’ll be drowning in the warming waters as we ponder as to how something like this could be happening, oblivious to the fact that we had many chances to prevent it in the past.”

Last month, it was reported that the world has just over a decade to stabilize climate change. On Nov. 4, the Supreme Court refused to stop a lawsuit that would force the Trump administration to do something about climate change. The plaintiffs of the case were aged between 11 and 22, which is pretty incredible when you think about it, but also kind of depressing–even children are dissatisfied with the government and its handling of climate change.

Despite the facts presented by the National Climate Assessment, which states that there are tons of humans are responsible for climate change, Trump has said in the past that he wants to prioritize U.S. jobs over resolving climate change, and he says he has reports that disputes climate change (however, there is no proof or confirmation that said reports even exist).

Again, we have a little over a decade–12 years approximately–to fix climate change, or at the very least stabilize it. Just 100 companies are responsible for 71 percent of global emissions. Yes, we as humans who live on this planet should all try to pitch in this save not only Earth, but humanity as well, but the responsibility should not be placed entirely on us. The rich have the money and the access to more effective resources than almost everyone else.

Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon, is the richest man on Earth, worth an estimated $166 billion. If he were to spend a few million dollars on stabilizing climate change, it’d be comparable to him throwing a few pennies away. The other 99 percent of the world–the ones who aren’t making thousands of dollars every 10 seconds–can only do so much.

The media, the rich, and political leaders cannot pin the blame on us or make it seem like it’s only our job. We all have a responsibility for preserving this planet. We’re the only planet that we know of that can host life, and it doesn’t seem like Mars is getting more of an alternate habitat option as days go by.

Something’s gotta give. Our government–our world–is corrupt enough already. There’s so many things that can be done. How many people must die to volcano eruptions, earthquakes, and hurricanes? How many more animals must die and eventually go extinct, and only live on through photos and textbooks? When will we put Earth first instead of money, which only has worth because some guy declared it to be so?

Reducing, reusing, and recycling isn’t going to cut it for the long run. We’ll be drowning in the warming waters as we ponder as to how something like this could be happening, oblivious to the fact that we had many chances to prevent it in the past.