District extends grading periods for the better

After+years+of+the+district+of+dividing+the+secondary+school+year+into+six+grading+periods%2C+middle+and+high+school+students+will+encounter+four+grading+periods+of+a+longer+duration.+Should+students+and+teachers+seize+the+opportunities+of+longer+periods%2C+there+could+be+educational+growth+in+store.
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District extends grading periods for the better

After years of the district of dividing the secondary school year into six grading periods, middle and high school students will encounter four grading periods of a longer duration. Should students and teachers seize the opportunities of longer periods, there could be educational growth in store.

After years of the district of dividing the secondary school year into six grading periods, middle and high school students will encounter four grading periods of a longer duration. Should students and teachers seize the opportunities of longer periods, there could be educational growth in store.

After years of the district of dividing the secondary school year into six grading periods, middle and high school students will encounter four grading periods of a longer duration. Should students and teachers seize the opportunities of longer periods, there could be educational growth in store.

After years of the district of dividing the secondary school year into six grading periods, middle and high school students will encounter four grading periods of a longer duration. Should students and teachers seize the opportunities of longer periods, there could be educational growth in store.

Wingspan Staff

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For years, middle and high school students In Frisco ISD have been rushing to improve their grades, study for tests, and turn in any remaining work six times a year as grading periods come to a close, whereas elementary school grading is structured into four nine-week periods. The district made the right choice in implementing nine-week grading periods for all secondary schools in the 2019-2020 school year: a change with potential to benefit students and teachers alike.

Longer grading periods present students struggling with concepts or workload the simple gift of more time. A rough start to a semester can be devastating, but with the first grading period being three weeks longer, students have the ability to seek help and more opportunities to improve their grade. Such growth can now be better reflected in the average score of a grading period. Now that UIL eligibility will not be assessed at every six weeks, students have more time to raise grades and maintain an active role in sports and extracurriculars.

As students are gifted with time, teachers will only be faced with grade submission deadlines twice a semester rather than three times. Teachers know all too well the struggle of grading tests and assessments the weekend before the due date, as well as fitting in assignments the last week to have enough grades for a period. With less time and energy wasted on this, teachers can more effectively engage with students and spread out assignments evenly through a period.

Without pushing to meet a deadline every six weeks, students should feel less pressure and can focus their energy on mastering concepts rather than living in fear of a grade, which is hardly the purpose of education. As a survey by the American Psychological Association shows that school is the most common source of stress for teens, even a subtle change like decreasing the number of grading periods can provide relief in a sensitive time. Putting a greater emphasis on learning and progress represents the positive effects that can come from this change.

With more chances for students to get help and boost their grades, and the ability for teachers to focus less energy on deadlines, cutting down on grade periods can undoubtedly improve education in the district. However, it is crucial for teachers and students not to take this change for granted, as taking advantage of newfound time and opportunities will ensure educational success, but pushing off work to the ninth week will only hold students back.