Book Review: Lord of the Flies

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Book Review: Lord of the Flies

The Lord of the Flies is a classic in the literary world. Dea-Mallika Divi reviews the widely known work.

The Lord of the Flies is a classic in the literary world. Dea-Mallika Divi reviews the widely known work.

The Lord of the Flies is a classic in the literary world. Dea-Mallika Divi reviews the widely known work.

The Lord of the Flies is a classic in the literary world. Dea-Mallika Divi reviews the widely known work.

Dea-Mallika Divi, Guest Contributor

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Wingspan’s Dea-Mallika Divi reviews the widely known classic and freshman reading requirement, The Lord of the Flies. 

A group of British schoolboys stranded on a exotic island without any grown ups could be the plot for one of countless dystopian novels published in the recent years. But William Golding was more than 50 years ahead of the curve when he authored  Lord of the Flies in 1954. It follows the adventures of the main characters, Ralph, Simon, Piggy, Roger, Sam and Eric; all who show savagery, courage and fear.

Fans of the action and survival genre will appreciate Golding’s novel. The climax hits the reader like a hurricane sucking them up into a whirlpool of intensity. The book is structured in a way that the beginning chapters are the calm before the storm increasing the severity of the events heightens as the story progresses.

Golding’s use of the English language leaves the reader confused at times, but adds to the sophisticated and well thought out plot of the story. The language used in the novel will expand one’s dictionary significantly as the diction is a major factor in symbolizing the complicated situation the boys find themselves in.

The book shows the world the startling truth of what would happen if masses of people are stranded. Golding highlights what can happen if major groups turned on each other and massacred each other.

Every sentence and every word is carefully written to ensure that the overall effect is maintained with Golding’s use of sentence structure in the climax a major part in why the climax has a lasting impression on readers.

Though the book is an amazing read, it like every other novel it has its faults. It is not a book for the faint hearted. It involves death and includes details that create gory images. At times, the reader feels the need to take a deep breath and then dive back into the whirlpool of emotions. Parts of the novel may offend some readers because it contradicts their beliefs and values by including concepts such as cannibalism. When one reads The Lord of the Flies an open mind is necessary in order to enjoy it to its full capacity.

Not the size of Harry Potter or The Lord of the Rings, the book is neither too short nor too long, and lands right in the Goldilocks Zone making it more approachable by all kinds of readers.

However, once the reader picks up the book, they will not be able to put it down. Whether or not the reader likes it, the book captures their attention till the very end. The Lord of the Flies by William Golding is a timeless adventure that keeps you guessing no matter how many times one reads it.