eLearning receives mixed responses from students and staff

Chromebook+carts+were+some+of+the+ways+the+school+ensured+students+were+able+to+participate+in+eLearning+from+home.+After+using+the+first+week+to+go+over+content+already+discussed+in+the+classroom%2C+starting+on+Monday+teachers+are+introduce+new+lessons.+

Caroline Attmore

Chromebook carts were some of the ways the school ensured students were able to participate in eLearning from home. After using the first week to go over content already discussed in the classroom, starting on Monday teachers are introduce new lessons.

Erika Pernis and Jordan Battey

With the continuation of the COVID-19 outbreak, eLearning has a new look this week as teachers are introducing new content starting on Monday.

For freshman Akanksha Mehta, this new system is very convenient, considering the situation. 

“I think eLearning is a great way for us to continue learning while we can’t physically attend school,” Akanksha said. “I’ve enjoyed being able to work at my own pace and the flexibility that comes with online school assignments.” 

However, the eLearning system can put an uncontrollable barrier between staff and students.

“As a teacher, I obviously like to be in control and moderate what happens in learning experiences. With a remote, eLearning format, that just is not possible,” Pre-AP Biology teacher Kristen Newton said. “I know I am not alone in this. A lot of teachers right now are really stressed out about how to ensure that we control who sees our lessons, quizzes, and tests. I can make a great lesson at home, but there is nothing I can do to make sure that all my students actually do that lesson and don’t just get a friend to text them answers.”

With the physical school shut down and all school-related activities and events as well, the last months of high school are a mixed bag for senior Anya Khosla.

“We’re fortunate to have eLearning as an option to continue our education,” Khosla said. “But with the current situation with COVID-19, it’s a bit saddening that we aren’t able to see the people we went through high school with till the situation gets better. All we can do is hope for the best as we move forward.”

Although eLearning is a new thing for everybody on campus, AP Human Geography teacher Tim Johannes thinks students and staff are doing just fine.

Everything seems so weird. In geography class, we learn about how advanced the world is becoming and yet the smallest thing can derail the world as we know it,” Johannes said. “eLearning is going very well. Most students are very proficient at keeping up with all of their classes. I think for the students it might be easier to go to one place for all classes like Canvas but most kids are great at figuring it out.”