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WINGSPAN

The student news site of Liberty High School in Frisco, Texas

WINGSPAN

The student news site of Liberty High School in Frisco, Texas

WINGSPAN

Campus artists advance to state

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  • Tuhina Das “The World She Saw” – “The World She Saw” is one of the pieces moving onto the state VASE competition in San Marcos. It was created digitally by Tuhina Das, as a rework of one of her previous drafts. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Vidhi Kaul “Still Life” – Vidhi Kaul’s “Still Life” piece was made using black and white charcoal pencils on multimedia paper. This piece was based off of a still life scene involving sunflowers and bones set up in Mrs. Delarios’ room. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Vivienne Haggard “Decadence” – “I submitted to VASE an artwork that I did called “Decadence”, and I submitted it because I really thought that my use of charcoal created a lot of depth with the piece,” Haggard said. “Decadence” was an extension of a still life project done by the Art II Advanced Class. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Kamilla Pashayeva “Lines of Life” – “Lines of Life” is a drawing of Kamilla Pashayeva’s grandmother, created using a monochromatic (black and white) color scale in order to highlight the detail of the piece. This grayscale artwork is among the three works by Redhawks advancing to the state competition. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Lekhya Thiriveedhi “Disco Head” – Lekhya Thiriveedhi’s painting “Disco Head” focuses on the principle of contrast, one of seven techniques taught in art classes on campus. The dark background creates a focal point of the reflective disco ball, as well as the subject’s white dress. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Mai Alkadi “Addicted” – “Addicted” was created by Mai Alkadi using two different mediums – paint in the background and graphite to create the subject. This piece focuses on the ties between humans and their phones, and how sometimes we even feel as if we can’t live without our devices. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Yejin Choi “Parent and Child” – “Parent and Child” was done in Yejin Choi’s personal style, similar to her other piece submitted into VASE titled “Siblings”. Both pieces focus on realism and use softer colors, as well as capturing moments of human interaction between family members. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Meghana Gadde “The Fruit of Culture” – “The Fruit of Culture” is a style of art called contour line. Contour line drawings are created by using one continuous line, meaning everything in the art is interwoven. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Noor Uppal “Sunken Memories” – Noor Uppal created “Sunken Memories” on a canvas, which adds texture (one of the seven elements of art) to the piece. This creation intertwines an underwater perspective with special items from the past (such as a teddy bear), as well as focusing on the way the light in the top-left corner refracts off of the bubbles. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Rithika Nallamolu “Summer” – Rithika Nallamolu created “Summer” using various shades of blue for a majority of the artwork, which helps unify the different elements of the piece. This piece includes various “easter eggs” of summer, including ice cream, popsicles, and shorts to bring about a nostalgic summer feeling. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Shanmukha Kammeta “The Damage” – “The Damage” by Shanmukha Kammeta contrasts the natural world with the artificial and manufactured parts of society. Kammeta also used a complementary color scheme (meaning two colors from opposite sides of the color wheel) to make the earth pop against the background. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Joaquin Perez “Apples” – Joaquin Perez’s drawing “Apples” was part of an art unit focusing on hyperrealism. Students were tasked to take a photo of fruit at the grocery store, and then use colored pencils to recreate this image as closely as possible. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Dominic Ward “Avocados” – Similar to Joaquin Perez’s piece “Apples”, “Avocados” by Dominic Ward was also created to mimic a photo of produce at a grocery store. This artwork showcases the highlights on the avocados, which contrast against the dominantly green color scheme. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Amy Chan “E“art”H” – Amy Chan used a variety of mediums to make “E“art”H”, including colored pencil and pen. The piece uses a monochromatic color scheme for half of the work, as most of the piece is just different shades of blue. The piece aims to show the contrast between valuing art, and valuing electronics. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Ishta Abinav “Echoes Within” – Ishta Abinav used paint on a canvas to make her work of art, titled “Echoes Within”. This piece focuses on self-reflection (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Aisha Thapa “Nature” – “Nature” by Aisha Thapa uses two of the seven elements of art – color and shape. The variety of color in the pieces serves to mimic the diversity of nature, while the entire background of the piece is composed of various shapes, which come together to create the illusion of flowers and fronds. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Advait Singh “Prism” – Advait Singh created “Prism” by blending various colored pencils. This drawing aims to capture the refracted light passed between light prisms, and to create a 3D feel despite being on a 2D surface. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered). (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Isabella Wang “Undone” – “Undone”, created by Isabella Wang, was made using graphite pencils. Graphite pencils can be blended (which creates a softer look) or used to make harsh strokes (which add definition and a focal point to the piece). (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Hallie Wang “Assistants” – “Assistants” uses two different types of painting – realism and Hallie Wang’s own personal cartoon style. The piece also focuses on the light of the piece, and uses darker colors to mimic the shadows cast on the subject by the light source. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Haily Buster “Whales Dancing in the Sky” – Haily Buster’s “Whales Dancing in the Sky” employs an analogous color scheme, meaning she used three colors next to each other on the color wheel to create this piece. The use of these colors creates contrast between the different elements of the painting, while still making the piece feel united as a whole. (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

  • Sydney Kiely “Owl” – “One of [my pieces] was a realistic still life which I did in art class,” Kiely said. “I worked really hard on it and was impressed with the high-quality result. I knew it would be a competitive piece going into VASE and was really looking to improve my score from last year.” (In order to make all images the same size some were stretched and blurred with the originally sized image centered).

This year’s VASE (Visual Arts Scholastic Event) competition was held at Memorial High School Saturday with nine Redhakws receiving the highest score possible (a four), and three moving onto the state competition April 26 – 27. 

Everyone there is so talented, it’s amazing. Their work is incredible and it’s great that we can admire their hard work. I love going around and seeing the different uses of media,

— sophomore Sydney Kiely

“It’s a UIL competition across the whole state of Texas for art students to bring their artwork in and have it judged by a juror from another district and then they’re able to compete,” art and ceramics teacher Elise Reed said. “Those pieces, if they get the highest score on a regional level, are eligible to move onto the state level. Liberty has three students advancing to the state level in San Marcos in April, so that’s really, really exciting.”

Advancing to state are junior Tuhina Das and sophomores Kamilla Pashayeva and Sydney Kiely.

“Their pieces will be displayed in San Marcos with all the other state pieces from Texas,” Reed said. “And then the rest of our students got really, really high scores. I would think most of them got the highest score in the region and they just did an awesome job.”

At the competition, artists were able to receive constructive feedback from the art jurors on how to improve their art moving forward.

“Feedback from the judges helps you develop as an artist and they’re really helpful with how you use your materials in your piece,” sophomore Vivenne Haggard. “I think VASE is a good opportunity for artists because it allows them to get feedback on their work and it looks really good on resumes.”

Sophomore Sydney Kiely agrees that feedback helps you create better art in the future.

“Art is subjective, making feedback difficult at times, however it can also be useful,” Kiely said. “This year I got some feedback on the presentation and the development of some of my artwork and it has helped me understand the different elements and materials that can go into a project, however, I think the best learning opportunity at VASE is when you get to look at all the art pieces that scored a 4 (artworks are scored 1 out of 4– 4 being the best.) and see what they did well and what you can do to improve your own quality.”

In addition to constructive criticism, Redhawks could view an expansive art gallery of other student works entered in VASE at Memorial.

VASE is a great opportunity for art students to showcase their art and talk about it with a judge,

— art teacher Elise Reed

“At around 10 o’clock the volunteers begin laying out all the artwork that got a 4 in the gyms,” Kieley said. “It’s definitely the most enjoyable part of the competition. Everyone there is so talented, it’s amazing. Their work is incredible and it’s great that we can admire their hard work. I love going around and seeing the different uses of media. It definitely opens your eyes to the limitless possibilities of art. There are sculptures, carvings, drawings, painting, and even clothing. It definitely challenges you to be very creative when competing with such good works.”

VASE serves as a unique opportunity for high school art students to interact with other teen artists and receive specialized feedback.

“VASE is a great opportunity for art students to showcase their art and talk about it with a judge,” Reed said. “They get a lot of good constructive feedback from the judges and they’re able to see what other kids are working on throughout the state, so it kind of boosts their creativity.”

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About the Contributor
Olivia Pulley, Staff Reporter

Olivia Pulley is a Sophomore and it’s her first year on Wingspan. On campus, Olivia is part of the National Art Honor Society and the Best Buddies club. Outside of school, you can find her volunteering with her youth group, hanging out with her friends, or shopping. She is very excited to be a part of Wingspan, and can’t wait to see where this year takes her!

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