Lessons become letters in AP government

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Lessons become letters in AP government

AP government students worked on their campaign letters. The project was introduced by Collegeboard to the new curriculum.

AP government students worked on their campaign letters. The project was introduced by Collegeboard to the new curriculum.

Dea-Mallika Divi

AP government students worked on their campaign letters. The project was introduced by Collegeboard to the new curriculum.

Dea-Mallika Divi

Dea-Mallika Divi

AP government students worked on their campaign letters. The project was introduced by Collegeboard to the new curriculum.

Prachurjya Shreya, Managing Editor

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Part of the First Amendment is being put into action in AP Government classes as students are petitioning the government for a redress of grievances by writing letters to local, state, and national officials and mailing them Thursday and Friday.

“The purpose of the letter writing project is to show my students conventional means a public participation that they can actively do very easily without having to go out and do anything,” AP Government teacher Kristin Lynch said. “This is a way of expressing your ideas in a way to get representatives to respond and to get to make a change and legislation and it’s simple it’s just writing a letter.”

Students like senior Andy Liu believe that the project has provided an opportunity to be politically active.

“I learned a lot about being politically active, and just talking to our representatives and making sure that our voices are heard,” he said. “And even though we’re students and we can’t vote yet, we still have the ability to go out and effect policies.”

Lynch believes students are the future of our country.

“I hope that when they see that maybe that the bill that they really want addressed gets address that they they understand that they have an impact on politics, a really big impact outside of just voting,” she said. “They can write letters and they can affect change on legislation and that’s really big.”

The assignment is a way for students that aren’t old enough to realize they have a voice in local, state, and national affairs.

“I think that even as kids, we should still go out and be very politically aware because politics doesn’t only affect adults, it affects kids as well,” Liu said. “Even though we can’t actually vote we can still do a lot of stuff like campaign because still go out and write letters in this has taught me that even as a kid we can still go out and do stuff.”