AP Human Geography students hope practice makes perfect

Freshmen+in+AP+human+geography+are+a+creating+study+groups+to+help+study+for+the+AP+test.+This+was+created+in+hopes+of+helping+with+the+stress+of+AP+season.
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AP Human Geography students hope practice makes perfect

Freshmen in AP human geography are a creating study groups to help study for the AP test. This was created in hopes of helping with the stress of AP season.

Freshmen in AP human geography are a creating study groups to help study for the AP test. This was created in hopes of helping with the stress of AP season.

Dea-Mallika Divi

Freshmen in AP human geography are a creating study groups to help study for the AP test. This was created in hopes of helping with the stress of AP season.

Dea-Mallika Divi

Dea-Mallika Divi

Freshmen in AP human geography are a creating study groups to help study for the AP test. This was created in hopes of helping with the stress of AP season.

Ashika Deshpande, Guest Contributor

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Many sophomore, juniors, and seniors in AP classes have gone through the what it’s like to sit through a test that could result in college credit, but for freshman, it’s a brand new experience. But on Saturday, students in AP Human Geography will be taking a mock exam from 8 – 10:30 a.m. in the cafeteria to prepare for the AP test on May 14.

“We’ve been preparing for this all year as our base line to start reviewing on the areas that they are weakest in,” AP Human Geography teacher Tim Johannes said. “So we’ll break down and see where their need is the greatest and improve.”

The test will be set in similar conditions to the actual AP test with students already preparing.

“I would order extra practice books to revise the information we learned in the beginning of the year since we have covered so many topics,” freshmen Meera Rajagopal said. “I would also take some practice tests online as well as the ones that are already in the book we use now which cover all the units we learned.”

The test consists of 75 multiple choice questions and three free response questions.

“The more you know the about geography the better, but that’s the hard part about it because they could ask about any place in the world,” Johannes said. “The tricky part is you are not going to know everything when you take the test.”

Students will have 60 minutes to answer 75 questions and 90 minutes to answer the three free response questions.

“We’ve had a lot of practice with the timed tests because we usually get 35 minutes to answer 40 to 50 questions for every test,” freshmen Samhitha Tegala said. “So it isn’t as nerve racking when we take the real test.”