Soccer helps bring STEAM to Frisco ISD 6th graders

FC Dallas and Hall of Fame partner with school district

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Diving deeper into the education and science behind soccer, FC Dallas launched their STEAM FC program on Thursday at Toyota Stadium powered by NEC and sponsored by CoServ and Southern New Hampshire University.

“It’s a fabulous educational program,” FC Dallas President Dan Hunt said. “I think most importantly, it shows the students of FISD that there are other jobs opportunities in sports. They can make an impact in the sports industry through education. That’s really the key into taking the successful steps and growing and building a resume and a career. It starts with a very simple basis.”

I think most importantly, it shows the students of FISD that there are other jobs opportunities in sports. They can make an impact in the sports industry through education.”

— FC Dallas President Dan Hunt

Implemented throughout the National Soccer Hall of Fame located on the south side of Toyota Stadium, technology including facial recognition software and virtual reality will look to help Frisco ISD 6th graders in the coming years.

“It never gets old,” Senior Vice President of External Affairs of Southern New Hampshire University Libby May said. “Opening these mini pitches and connecting young people with these opportunities is really the core of what we do as a university. We are grateful to be here. We hope that this mini pitch and this wonderful educational opportunity will provide a safe place for people in this community particularly young people to learn and grow.”

FC Dallas will spend 17 weeks each year dedicated to the STEAM program. Each week, a different FISD middle school will get to send their 6th graders on a one-day field trip to the Hall of Fame.

“I thought it was cool because FC Dallas gets to share something they love with students with all the schools in the facility,” 6th grade Staley student Giovani Ceniceros said. “I haven’t joined a team yet but I’ve been kicking the soccer ball since I was three. My plans are to combine soccer with school because at the same time it has math, science, and physics kind of in it.”

When visiting the Hall of Fame, the students can participate in four different stations: Classroom Lesson, Movement Lab, National Soccer Hall of Fame Experience, and Toyota Stadium Tour.

We are really excited to partner with FC Dallas and create an opportunity for our 6th grade students to learn about soccer, but also the STEAM principles.”

— FISD area director for secondary instruction Dr. Angela Romney

“We are really excited to partner with FC Dallas and create an opportunity for our 6th grade students to learn about soccer, but also the STEAM principles,” FISD area director for secondary instruction Dr. Angela Romney said. “It’s really a combination of science, math, technology, engineering, art, and then also working with the sports industry.”

FC Dallas forward Ricardo Pepi wishes this program was around when he was growing up.

“Back then you would just have to go to school and then after practice,” Pepi said. “Now you get to do it while your playing soccer so I think that this is amazing.”

Wester Middle School will be the first to experience the ongoing partnership between the National Soccer Hall of Fame, FC Dallas Foundation, and Frisco ISD through the programs debut on Oct. 8-9.

“We’ve really seen a change in the whole sports industry in the last decade,” Hunt said. “I think soccer, interestingly, is leading the way. It’s always been based in statistics and data. There’s so much information that comes in and processes. I think every student will be different, every athlete will be different and the things that they will grasp from the program, the things they’ll take along with them. But it completes the person, make them better at their jobs, better on the field. It’s really an integration into a lot of different concepts that produce people, allow people to be the best they can be.”