All Voices Matter: your vote matters

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All Voices Matter: your vote matters

In her weekly column, All Voices Matter, staff reporter Aviance Pritchett gives her take on social and cultural issues.

In her weekly column, All Voices Matter, staff reporter Aviance Pritchett gives her take on social and cultural issues.

Prachurjya Shreya

In her weekly column, All Voices Matter, staff reporter Aviance Pritchett gives her take on social and cultural issues.

Prachurjya Shreya

In her weekly column, All Voices Matter, staff reporter Aviance Pritchett gives her take on social and cultural issues.

If you’re against the status quo, then vote. Don’t sit back and say “Oh, someone else will vote, something will change,” because you’re just proving that you aren’t concerned for the future of the country and the rights of its inhabitants. You have the right to vote, and now’s your chance. Change doesn’t happen magically. Do something,”

Early voting for midterm elections starts on Monday, that’s next week, as of the time this is being written. During the 2016 election, 51 percent of millenials and 63 percent of Gen X voted–that was the highest voting turnout of those groups since 1996. But that was a presidential election. However, the Nov. 6 general election is crucial and it’s important everybody of eligible voting age does their civic duty.

Here in Texas, the spotlight is on Republican Senator Ted Cruz and his opponent Congressman Beto O’Rourke. Vote.org and Vote.gov are wonderful resources to get started. DMV.org says that people may register to vote any time after you have reached the age of 17 years and 10 months or after you turn 18 years old, and you must be a citizen of the United States.

And your vote does matter. The House and Senate are a part of Congress, with the power to change our society and country with one law or bill. We’ve seen the Me Too movement, the March For Our Lives movement, and the Women’s March movement. If you agree with these movements and the changes they demand, then vote.

If you’re against the status quo, then vote. Don’t sit back and say “Oh, someone else will vote, something will change,” because you’re just proving that you aren’t concerned for the future of the country and the rights of its inhabitants. You have the right to vote, and now’s your chance.

Change doesn’t happen magically. Stop complaining, forever droning about how something must be done, that our country is in shambles, that our country is run by maniacs.

Do something.

Your Twitter threads on why gun control should be taken more seriously isn’t going to make Congress change a thing, nor will your Tumblr essay on why Trump is bad so let’s make him resign.

I’m only 16, and I know that when I turn 17, I’m going to register to vote. I want my voice to be heard. I want serious change and reparations, not empty promises. Our government was always a corrupt mess, but we can fix it if we just start voting. Protest can only do so much.

It’s time to start doing things. If you want change, then take it seriously. Commit to your ideals and vote.