Carving creativity out of linoleum

Sophomore+Aryan+Samal+works+on+his+linoleum+carving+project.+%E2%80%9CIt%E2%80%99ll+probably+take+us+more+than+two+weeks+to+complete.+There%E2%80%99s+a+lot+of+thinking+that+goes+on%2C+mostly+because+you+only+have+one+chance+to+carve+and+any+mistakes+you+make+are+final%2C%E2%80%9D+art+teacher+Pernie+Fallon+said.+
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Carving creativity out of linoleum

Sophomore Aryan Samal works on his linoleum carving project. “It’ll probably take us more than two weeks to complete. There’s a lot of thinking that goes on, mostly because you only have one chance to carve and any mistakes you make are final,” art teacher Pernie Fallon said.

Sophomore Aryan Samal works on his linoleum carving project. “It’ll probably take us more than two weeks to complete. There’s a lot of thinking that goes on, mostly because you only have one chance to carve and any mistakes you make are final,” art teacher Pernie Fallon said.

Trisha Dasgupta

Sophomore Aryan Samal works on his linoleum carving project. “It’ll probably take us more than two weeks to complete. There’s a lot of thinking that goes on, mostly because you only have one chance to carve and any mistakes you make are final,” art teacher Pernie Fallon said.

Trisha Dasgupta

Trisha Dasgupta

Sophomore Aryan Samal works on his linoleum carving project. “It’ll probably take us more than two weeks to complete. There’s a lot of thinking that goes on, mostly because you only have one chance to carve and any mistakes you make are final,” art teacher Pernie Fallon said.

Shreya Jagan, Staff Reporter

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Changing gears from drawing to a different medium, PAP Art 2 students are taking on carving for a change.

“The project is called reductive carving,” art teacher Pernie Fallon said. “It’s pretty intense, it’ll probably take us more than two weeks to complete. There’s a lot of thinking that goes on, mostly because you only have one chance to carve and any mistakes you make are final.”

 Though the process seems simple, it takes a lot of time and precision to execute correctly.

“Basically, we’re given a block of linoleum and we picked out leaves that we liked and we draw it on that block and we carve it out,” sophomore Marco Figueroa said. “From there, we layer different colors on top of the block three times and transfer it to paper.” 

Hoping to bring life to the dull leaves, sophomore Jada Mignot sees the project through a different lens.

“You can be creative with the piece, it teaches you how to be patient,” she said. “That’s what art is. You present who you are and what you enjoy doing through your piece.”

But while the process is strenuous, the ends results make up for the time and effort.

“I think the students and I are both most excited for the reveal,” Fallon said. “ I mean the students do enjoy the carving of it, but once you peel off the paper after printing the colors on, I think that’s truly the best part.”