Dresses impress at DMA

Yael Even, Staff Reporter

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Dior, From Paris to the World, a new exhibit at the Dallas Museum Art, is a must see for anyone interested in fashion. Tickets are required, and only a limited number of people can go in at once, giving the exhibit an exclusive vibe.

Showcased in a dim setting, the dresses are powerful, making a statement celebrating femininity. Although Christian Dior passed in 1957, various designers such as Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferre, John Galliano, Raf Simons, and since 2016, Maria Grazia Chiuri, who is now the artistic director for Christian Dior, were featured honoring the Dior legacy.

Trying to describe the exhibit, wow is the first thing that comes to mind, as jaws will drop with every turn of a corner brings another bold and beautiful outfit. The time and dedication spent on every dress, from the beading, to the colorful details, to all the thought put into each design, is clear and obvious.

But it’s not just the final products on display, all the mocks, and the failed prototypes are also part of the exhibit. Called “The Office of Dreams”, it contains a broken zipper, an uneven piece of fabric around the waist, and incorrect measurements, failure hanging up for the world to see.

Walking into the next room, failure is turned into something great as all the previous designs are shown in their fully finished glory as patrons are able to understand Dior’s thought process, and that there is no shame in failure.

Dior wasn’t just a man who focused on one woman, he put his heart and soul into fashion for women from all over the world. This is evident in the main room “From Paris to the World,” with each outfit representing a woman from another culture, and another lifestyle. Yet each piece had a unique take from a couple of saris to tribal African wear to a piece tributing Egypt’s national animal, the steppe eagle.

This new Dior exhibit is a summer must leaving females feeling empowered. Not only does it showcase great works of art, but it teaches a valuable lesson: there is no shame in failure as something great can be made out of it.